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Offline v

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Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« on: October 23, 2009, 07:04:17 PM »

For those of you who may not know, Image Comics is on the cusp of one of their most ambitious crossover events that will bring together many of their most followed characters. Expect to see:

- Savage Dragon
- Ripclaw
- Shadowhawk
- Witchblade

...and more. All fighting against Spawn...say what?

Check out the main website for it all at:

http://imageunitedinfo.blogspot.com/

Offline Beardicus

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2009, 12:03:07 AM »
I think I posted about this back when it was announced :P personally haven't read it but have heard it's decent

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2009, 07:44:33 AM »
no ones read it as not released yet :)

starts in november. and i guess i missed your post on it.

Offline Beardicus

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2009, 01:11:39 PM »
Oh lol thought it was already out :P must have some preview copies floating around

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2009, 12:24:13 AM »
and so everyone knows, i'm gonna try and work in some of what happens here into the crisis storyline if possible.

Offline Beardicus

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2009, 12:14:41 PM »
I cant wait for it  :D!

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2009, 09:12:19 AM »
Check out this varient cover for issue #1 of Image United by Jim Lee


This crossover is going to be epic. For other info on it, go to: http://imageunitedinfo.blogspot.com/
« Last Edit: November 06, 2009, 11:46:49 AM by youngdragun »

Offline Beardicus

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2009, 10:31:24 AM »
That new Spawn is freaking awesome looking

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2009, 07:11:07 PM »
http://www.usatoday.com/life/comics/2009-11-10-valentino-imageunited-st_N.htm

Jim Valentino on Image United and ShadowHawk

By John Geddes, USA TODAY
In the third of seven interviews with the creators of the upcoming Image United comic book series, Image Comics co-founder Jim Valentino discusses his role on the much-anticipated project.

Launching Nov. 25, Image United will mark the first time that the Image Comics co-founders have regrouped to work on a single comic together. Each artist will assume full drawing duties for the characters that they originally created in the earliest days of Image Comics.

In an exciting development, it was announced last week that the sole Image co-founder not involved in the project, Jim Lee, has now come on board to draw the cover to issue No. 1 in the series. That means all seven co-founders, plus series writer and current Image partner Robert Kirkman, are now involved in this groundbreaking new series.

Valentino recently took a few moments with USA TODAY to answer some questions about Image United and discuss his storied career in the comic-book industry.

Q. What was your original reaction to the idea of doing Image United?

A. I thought it was a great idea. I'm one of the guys who's always in favor of creating a more unified comics universe, so when the idea for Image United was floated, I thought it sounded great daunting, but great.

Q. How does your character ShadowHawk fit in with the group that's fighting the old Spawn, Al Simmons?

A. This will be the newer version of ShadowHawk. He's a 17-year-old kid named Eddie Collins who is just kind of star-struck by being in the midst of these other heroes. He doesn't have a lot of experience but he's still very good at what he does. It's a bit like meeting your favorite rock band and just standing there awestruck. With this character, though, there is a major change that's going to take place that will lead to a new series. It's a huge change for the character. It's massive nuclear bomb, in scale. I can't say any more than that, though.

Q. Erik Larsen jokingly says he's the one toblamefor getting the ball rolling on Image United is that a fair assessment?

A. I think you'll find that the guys keep their tongues pretty firmly in cheek. But, yeah, Erik came up with the idea to do this. We regrouped in May of 2008 on Free Comics Day and it just started the gears in Erik's mind clicking. He did the heavy lifting in terms of getting us all to buy into the idea of doing a single comic together.

Q. Image Comics, under your watch as publisher, brought in talents like Robert Kirkman and Brian Michael Bendis. Can you explain a little bit about how you identify talent what you look for in writers and artists?

A. It's really hard to quantify. You're looking for originality, first and foremost. You want unique concepts but you also need skilled execution. I knew Brian, for example, was going to be really, really good from the beginning. The pieces just fell into place right away for him. But with Robert, the talent was definitely there from the start, but the projects he was working on weren't necessarily clicking at first. Once he got paired with something that matched his talent, he was fine. You really need to match the right material with the right talent. It's not always an easy thing to do and it's not always a quick process.

Q. What was the motivation behind Silverline Books?

A. My background in comics grew originally from the 1960s Silver Age and then later the indie comics of the '70s. Back in those early days, comics were seen as being mostly childish or subversive in some ways. Comics eventually became more accepted but continued to push the envelope as to what they could do in terms of content. We reached a point where comic books wanted to prove they were adult. These days, I think they can go too far at times, though.

Silverline is our children's book imprint that produces books that go back to those early days. I'm trying to bring it back to a larger audience and let kids discover the fun of comics again. Silverline books combine the sequential art of the comic format with all-ages stories to create books that are inviting to anyone. Some of the titles we have out there now include The Lava is a Floor, Tiffany's Epiphany, Dear Dracula and Timothy & the Transgalactic Towel.

Q. Can you please explain what The Hero Initiative is and your involvement in it?

A. Jim McLaughlin started this organization to help creators in need. This usually not always, but usually is used to assist the elderly in our field who have fallen on tough times. We try to raise money to help these creators writers, artists, editors and get them back on their feet again. I'm part of the disbursement committee. It's something I'm really proud to be involved with. We want to give back to the industry that helped put some of us where we are.

Q. You had involvement in the old Marvel "What If " series from time to time; stories that imagined alternate universes where the repercussions of events that either did or did not take place were examined. If you had a "What if " title that you could write today, what would it be?

A. I'd write "What if Bill Watterson hadn't given up Calvin & Hobbes?"

http://www.usatoday.com/life/comics/2009-11-10-valentino-imageunited-st_N.htm

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2009, 07:14:45 PM »
http://www.newsarama.com/comics/091111-image-united-whilce-portacio.html

IMAGE UNITED Weekly - WHILCE PORTACIO


By Vaneta Rogers

Image United, the six-issue "jam session" with six of the artists who founded the publishing company 17 years ago, hits stores November 25th with a story by the newest Image partner, Robert Kirkman.

The six series artists involved in the event Erik Larsen, Rob Liefeld, Todd McFarlane, Whilce Portacio, Marc Silvestri and Jim Valentino made comic book history in 1992 when they and Jim Lee left Marvel Comics to start Image Comics. Founded on the idea that creators own their intellectual properties, Image started with launches of series like Youngblood, The Savage Dragon and Spawn.

Now the six founders are doing something in Image United that's pretty revolutionary each artist will draw the characters he created, meaning sometimes one page might have six artists working on it, sending pages back and forth until they are finished.

Plus, as Newsarama previewed last week, even Jim Lee is getting involved by providing a variant cover for Image United.

When the series was announced in 2008, many fans wondered if the six artists, many of whom now administer their own studios and companies, would be able to find the time to make the project work. But a little over a year later, the first issue of Image United is finished and the series is on its way to completion.

In our next installment Image United Weekly, a series of interviews with the creative team, leading up to the release of the first issue, we turn to Whilce Portacio.

The artist has a unique position among the other artists involved in Image United because he's got a new character appearing in the comic Fortress.

Newsarama: We've talked before about how this whole project came together. But what was your personal motivation to do this? Why did the project and the opportunity appeal to you in particular?
 
Whilce Portacio: I for one was starting to finalize my thoughts on a new character that I would like to publish under Image. When the guys approached me with the opportunity to launch the character through a big event, I couldn't say no. The biggest problem with launching a new character is advertising; getting the public to realize there is a new guy in town. So doing it this way was a gift.

Nrama: Looking back, the founding of Image Comics in 1992 has come to mean a lot of things to a lot of people. How do you remember that time?
 
Portacio: We were all young guys back then, full of all the possibilities and believing in our abilities. Being young, we failed at some, but amazingly achieved most of what we hoped to accomplish. It was a time of pure artistic freedom. It was as easy as if we could think it would happen and were blessed that our audience was in full sync with us. Nothing seemed impossible; our only limit was our furtive imaginations.

For me, who ever since I was young having had an attachment to art and computers, was able to merge the two. I was part of the group tasked to figure out how to utilize Photoshop to color comics. My best memories were in the Wildstorm FX pit area and main output office, sometimes until 3:30 a.m. or so, getting a book ready to be sent to the printers. That time the studio ran 24/7 and we basically lived and breathed comics 24/7.

Nrama: With this project, do the words Image United have more than one meaning? What do they mean to you?

Portacio: After all these incident filled years gone by, we're still friends, we're still a group, and we're still doing the thing we love...comics.

Nrama: What can you tell us about this new character you're introducing?
 
Portacio: Fortress is introduced as the ultimate mysterious new character with almost no understanding of what he is. He fumbles through the event, eventually finding it in his heart that he is part of this new whole and gives his all to protect Image.

Nrama: What's the process been like over the last year of working on Image United?
 
Portacio: The process, as cumbersome as it seems and is, in its way has become a somewhat magical process. The best art happens when you let your artistic instincts go and let them take you where they will. The best part of that is the magic of not knowing what to expect and seeing it happen in front of your eyes. To see it grow from your best on that page to another's best, to another, and soon you have a magically perfect page in front of you. A page of all these different elements by different people combining to make perfect sense together.

Nrama: Have you guys hit any snafus? How did you overcome them?
 
Portacio: We've always been a verbal group, especially just amongst ourselves, and with the advent of modern technology, especially the internet. All communication is instantaneous through group mail. Every aspect is touched on and touched on and touched on in real time by the group wherever we all may be. In fact, gathering together all that e-mail back and forth might make an interesting insight into who Image really is. Of course, majority rules, but we've never had to, as of yet, break an impasse in that way. We discuss all ways of thinking about something and eventually agree. Some of the harder decisions have to go to the next day and that sees us coming to a consensus. I, for my part, don't feel the need to always state my views, mainly because someone else almost always has the same views, so I feel no need to repeat a view.

Nrama: Are you feeling good about your ability to get all the issues done in a timely manner?
 
Portacio: The best part for me is the practice it gives me to really figure out how I want Fortress to look. I've also taken a new approach to Fortress. This is the first book where I quickly pencil layout fortress and then I go directly in with the ink, basically drawing with the ink. It's exhilarating and loads of fun this way. So I attack each page as I get them.

Nrama: Do you think this experience has shaped the way your company will work in the future?
 
Portacio: I think this has refocused us as a whole to think more about being an interactive universe.

Nrama: If someone else was planning to do a comic the same way, what advice would you have for them?
 
Portacio: You've got to have fun. You've got to want to do it. It's a lot of work.
http://www.newsarama.com/comics/091111-image-united-whilce-portacio.html

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2009, 08:31:00 PM »
Image United is Invincible



In a recent interview with Wizard Magazine talks with all of the Image United creators. There is a specific segment in which Rob Liefeld and Robert Kirkman are talking about characters appearing in Image United.

Liefeld: "I know the other guys have similar feelings about how they're going to weave in and out of the story with Image United. Being part of the universe again seeing Youngblood and Spawn and everybody next to each other...it looks awesome. And Invincible's involved. We've got to let the cat out of the bag at some point, right?"

Kirkman: "All of the artists have characters showing up in the book, why wouldn't the writer the writer have a character showing up? That's just...we'll see."

Liefeld: "Are we that stupid that we would insist that Robert includes his characters? [Laughs] The mystery is when they'll be there, who will be in there, and who will draw it."

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2009, 06:38:31 PM »
Issue #1 - Jim Lee Variant Cover IN COLOR


Offline Beardicus

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2009, 10:55:53 PM »
That "evil" Spawn is so wicked looking  W(- -)W Ive only seen that cover in pencil up to this point

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2009, 09:10:58 PM »
Kirkman Talks Image United

By Robert Kirkman on November 16, 2009
http://techland.com/2009/11/16/kirkman-talks-image-united/



In the summer of 1991 I didnt even know what a comic book store was.

Id been reading comics for a little over a year by that point, but Id been purchasing them at gas stations, drug stores and my small town Wal-Mart. I was 12 years old. When my mother drove by The Comic Interlude, I almost jumped from the moving vehicle. I couldnt believe there was an entire store dedicated solely to selling comic books. My whole world had changed.

It took some convincing to get my mom to drive me back to the store and actually allow me to go inside, but I was very persistent. As I entered, the first thing I saw, in a small foyer before you got into the actual store was a poster for a brand new comic, something Id never heard of, called YOUNGBLOOD. This new title was created by Rob Liefeld, one of my favorite comic book artists. But as far as I knew, Rob was still drawing X-Force for Marvel comics.

I walked into the store, marveling at what I saw before me, rows upon rows of comics. The middle of the store was lined with boxes of comics, and hanging on the wall behind the clerk more comics. Id never seen such a place. I went to the shelf and proceeded to snag all the comics Id been regularly purchasing at Wal-Mart. Wolverine, drawn by a fill-in artist, Spider-Man, drawn by a fill-in artist, X-Men and Uncanny X-Men, both drawn by a fill-in artist even X-Force was drawn by a fill-in artist. I didnt know what was going on.

When I got to the counter I asked the clerk about Youngblood: Was that a new Marvel book? He replied that it was an Image Comic. I was learning about a lot of new things that day. He explained to me that essentially all my favorite comic artists at the time, who had all done high profile work at Marvel Comics, were leaving that company to form a new comic book company that would publish all of their new creations.

Thats why Marc Silvestri wasnt drawing Wolverine, and Erik Larsen wasnt drawing Spider-Man, and Jim Lee wasnt drawing X-Men, and Whilce Portacio wasnt drawing Uncanny X-Men, and Rob Liefeld wasnt drawing X-Force.

Todd McFarlane, arguably the most popular comic artist in the industry at the time, was enjoying a period of semi-retirement after the birth of his first child. He had just completed a run on Spider-Man that broke all kinds of sales records. His involvement in this new Image experiment was a big deal. Jim Valentino, who rounded out the original Image crew, wrote and drew a book called Guardians of the Galaxy at Marvel that Id never read, but his new series for Image, ShadowHawk ended up being one of my favorites.

All the Image Comics rolled out over the summer of 1992. By then, I was 13, and I purchased every single one of those books: Rob Liefelds Youngblood and Brigade, Todd McFarlanes Spawn, Erik Larsens Savage Dragon, Jim Lees WildC.A.T.S., Jim Valentinos ShadowHawk, Marc Silvestris Cyberforce. They quickly became my favorite comics. By the end of the year, Id stopped buying Marvel Comics altogether.

Up until this point it had never occurred to me that comic book characters even had creators. There were people out there who created Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, The X-Men everyone and their names werent Marvel or DC. Creator-owned comics had been around for a couple decades by that time, but seeing the top creators at Marvel leave to form their own company instantly drew a massive amount of eyes to the movement.

I quickly learned about how Jack Kirby, co-creator of some characters you may have heard of like The Fantastic Four, The Hulk, The X-Men, Captain America and countless others wasnt making a dime off of them. At that time those characters had been around for 30 years or more and this guy hadnt gotten so much as a thank you from the fine folks at merry old Marvel. And this happened across the board, at both Marvel and DC Comics. For every character enjoyed by millions, there was a creator out there watching his creation live on without him, without any kind of compensation, and in many cases, credit.

The Image guys said, No more. They were going to pave their own way. They were going to turn the tables and instead of allowing Marvel to profit from their creations years down the road, they were going to use their popularity, gained from working on Marvel titles, to launch their own company as a place to create new characters they and others could profit from for years down to come.

And it worked.

Within a year, and with only a fraction of the titles published by Marvel or DC, Image Comics passed DC to became the number two comics publisher. Image never produced enough titles to maintain that ranking, but it has continued, for the last 17 years, publishing cutting edge creator-owned comics that provide the industry with a model for creator rights and fair treatment of creators that is often imitated, but never duplicated.

Image Comics was and is something special.

The exodus from Marvel Comics and the formation of Image Comics has informed nearly every step Ive taken in my humble career as a comic book writer. I was privileged to start my career with creator-owned work, self-publishing a little known comedy/superhero series called Battle Pope. I eventually gained notice by Image Comics founder Erik Larsen who helped me move from self-published comics to actually producing original, creator-owned comics of my own for Image Comics. Comics that I, as the creator, own not Image Comics.

After working at Image for a year, I got the call from Marvel offering me tall dollars to come work for them. I did so Im not going to pretend I dont love their characters and working for Marvel is something that will always impress my mother. But I only did so, provided I could continue to work on my Image titles at the same time. To their credit, Marvel complied and while there I created more than a few characters that remain in use at the company today (albeit in much smaller roles than say, Spider-Man, or even Howard the Duck). But I always knew in the back of my mind that Image was where I belonged. I had a good time at Marvel and was treated well, but I much preferred writing my own characters and having the freedom to do whatever I wanted within the context of any story.

So after spending four years working for both Marvel and Image, I left Marvel, deciding to focus solely on my creator-owned work, titles like INVINCIBLE and THE WALKING DEAD, that by that time had been running for years and were quite successful in their own right. It was at this time that the remaining Image partners, Todd McFarlane, Erik Larsen, Marc Silvestri and Jim Valentino decided to bring me into the company as a partner, something theyd never done before.

Now Ive gone from learning about Image Comics on my first ever visit to a comic shop to actually participating in running the company, deciding what books we publish and what actions we take in this ever-changing publishing world.

Which is kind of a dream come true, if Im honest. But the icing on the cake of this life I could only dream of when I was 13 is a little thing called IMAGE UNITED. For the first time ever the founders of Image Comics have, heh united to do a series together where they all produce the art. So theyre each drawing the characters that they created each time they appear which is another way theyre breaking the mold and doing something completely different. Each page of this series is going to showcase the work of multiple artists, all working together to tell one story in a way that has never been attempted before in comics. When Spawn is on the page, hell be drawn by his creator, Todd McFarlane, when Savage Dragon is on a page, hell be drawn by Erik Larsen, and so on down the line.

And they asked little old me to write this series. What an honor.

As I write this were knee deep in the production of this series, which has been an undertaking of monumental proportions for all involved. But I find myself constantly thinking back to that chubby little kid who grew into this chubby little man and what he would say to me if he could see me now.

-Robert Kirkman
Backwoods, KY
November 2009

Actual article is at: http://techland.com/2009/11/16/kirkman-talks-image-united/

...and includes an extensive preview to Image United #1

Offline Beardicus

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Re: Image United: Image Comics crossover event
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2009, 11:20:05 PM »
For anyone that reads all of that and is very familiar with Image its quite a treat!

Thanks V